New Cambridge Murder Mystery Ready To Preorder

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Following on from my interview with Charlot King, I’m pleased to announce that she’s got a new book coming out soon called A Christmas Mystery. 

I’m a recent convert to festive themed books, so I’m very excited for this upcoming novel, which is the forth in her Cambridge Murder Mysteries series.

In the latest instalment in the series, protagonist Professor Elizabeth Green, a professor of poisons, attempts to solve murders before everyone opens their presents on Christmas Day. As her peers are found dead in the College, the professor has her hands full trying to uncover the truth.

The new book will be available in Heffers Bookshop, Cambridge, this Christmas, joining Charlot’s other three books, Poison, Cursed and Blood Moon. You can preorder it on Amazon HERE.

Addressed To Kill Review: A Creepy Christmas Crime Story

COVER FOR ADDRESSED TO KILL

The newest instalment in the Inspector Stark novels features a chilling Christmas mystery, as Keith Wright delivers another thrilling instalment in this incredible series.

In 1987 Inspector Stark is gearing up for another busy Christmas, having just enjoyed his station’s festive shindig, when on Christmas Eve the body of a young woman is found having been brutally raped and murdered in a park.

Switching between viewpoints, Wright paints a picture of a deeply twisted murderer with a strange modus operandi revolving around toying with his victims before raping and brutally murdering them.

As such, Stark and his team are forced to spend the festive season battling to find the culprit before he attacks again. With many leads to follow and a variety of red herrings put in their way, the team have their work cut out if they want to uncover the truth.

Wright isn’t afraid to delve into the gritty details of sordid crimes such as this, and as such this book, much like the others in the series, has many enticing details that will engage and thrill crime fiction fans. For those who love reading creepy, dark novels full of suspense, this is the book for you this winter.

It’s not as atmospheric as it could be, but Wright has a way of pushing the plot along so you hardly notice, and instead quickly become wrapped up in the disturbing world of the killer and the police’s obsessive hunt for the truth. Stark and his team, as well as the other characters readers encounter, are all deeply human and well-rounded, making the story believable and engaging.

Overall I was incredibly impressed by Addressed To Kill. I’m not usually a big fan of Christmas themed books, but in this novel Wright shows how the festive season makes victims more unsuspecting and gives killers opportunities they don’t usually have, making it an eye-opening and gripping tale that you’ll want to revisit time and time again.

 

His Dark Materials Proves Fantasy Is Better As TV Shows Not Films

his dark materials

The BBC’s new adaptations of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy proves that fantasy novels deserve to be made into TV shows, rather than films.

The Northern Lights, the first book in critically acclaimed series, designed originally for children, was adapted as a film a few years ago and renamed The Golden Compass.  

The film was a flop, for the simple reason that it tried to fit so this vast book, with all of its exposition and explanation, into one film. It was a long film, but not long enough to fit in all of the knowledge required to make viewers fully understand the concepts and worlds Pullman created.

The appeal of the show, rather than the film, is that it doesn’t ‘tell’ the story so much as it shows you. There are no huge info-dumps, nor any rambling conversations that are exclusively exposition designed to fill you in quickly before something else happens. Instead, the show draws you into the world of Lyra and Pan, showing you everything that happens whilst not overwhelming you.

The critical success of the TV series also shows that fantasy epics belong on television, not in films. HBOs beloved Game Of Thrones is another good example of a book set that would’ve made an awful film series, but as TV show it flourished (until the writers went and blew it on the final series).

Sometimes films can bring fantasy books to life, as is the case with Lord of the Rings, however it can be argued that the films are far too long, and would be better off serialised on TV. Indeed, Amazon has commissioned a series based on Tolkien’s epic novels, proving that the stories have yet more potential that, I don’t think, more films could fulfil.

Overall, it’s clear to see that fantasy belongs on TV. Adapting it for films means cramming it into too little time, or creating far too many, far too long movies that are hard to sit through. The best way to experience fantasy is always to read it, as that way you can let your imagination run away with you and really immerse yourself in the ideas and new worlds the author has created. However, if you’re going to watch fantasy, I urge you to watch a TV show version of your favourites, rather than slogging your way through a boring film

Audiobooks Aren’t Better Than Normal Books: They’re A Different Thing

headphones Audiobook concept

An Esquire Magazine article I read recently had me livid. They claimed that certain audiobooks were better than the actual books themselves.

Before anyone points it out, yes I did spot the disclaimer at the top so yes, I understand that this is an affiliated post and they’re basically just trying to earn money using a controversial headline to get people to buy audiobooks so that they’ll get the commission for the sale. I’m not completely uninitiated on how this sort of advertising works.

However, what got me was how easily the magazine could claim that certain books were better as audiobooks whilst missing the fact that audiobooks are completely different things. Unlike ebooks, which are simply books stored on electronic devices and which still require actual reading, using your eyes, audiobooks use a different sense, hearing.

As such, audiobooks are a completely different experience from reading an actual book. While they are enjoyable in most cases, there’s something to be said for reading an actual book. And whilst there are some books that some people might prefer to hear in audiobook form rather than reading themselves, they won’t get the same enjoyment out of them because audiobooks are completely different to real books.

Also, in reading books our imaginations are able to craft the voices, settings and general characterisations for us, whereas audiobooks use sounds and different voices or accents to lend atmosphere to the listening experience. As a result, less imagination is required, but people get less from the experience of listening to an audiobook, and often have a completely different view of the text than they would’ve done if they read it.

In conclusion, it’s my belief that saying a certain book is better as an audiobook is like saying that you shouldn’t read a specific novel and instead just watch the TV show. You can like one, you can like the other, but you can’t seriously tell me that they’re the same thing.